Postman pre-request script for Laravel registration

A common way to register in a Laravel API is to send a POST request to /users containing a username, password, any other info, and also an HMAC signature using a server-side secret. In this example, it’s validated on the server by this class:

public const HASH_ALGORITHM = 'sha256'; protected const REQUEST_KEYS = [ 'email', 'name', ]; private $secret; public function __construct(string $secret = null) { if (! $secret) { throw new \InvalidArgumentException('The registration secret must be provided'); } $this->secret = $secret; } public function verify(Request $request): bool { return rescue( function () use ($request) { $hash = hash_hmac( self::HASH_ALGORITHM, json_encode($request->only(self::REQUEST_KEYS)), $this->secret ); return hash_equals( base64_encode($hash), $request->get('signature', '') ); }, false );
Code language: PHP (php)

So we can see that it’s expecting a Base64-encoded HMAC-SHA256 signature of a JSON array containing the email and name properties.

If you’re trying to make this request in Postman, you obviously need to calculate this same signature or it won’t work. Fortunately Postman has pre-request scripts that can inspect bits of your request and environment and generate new elements before your request is sent, and that’s what we need to use.

We don’t want the secret to be saved in our request collection, so we keep it in an environment, and pull it out dynamically when the request is made. Postman includes the Crypto-js package, which includes the necessary signature and encoding functions we need. Coming from PHP, the syntax for these operations feels very convoluted, but it goes like this:

const signature_string = '{"email":"' + request.data.email + '","name":"' + request.data.name + '"}'; const hmac = CryptoJS.HmacSHA256(signature_string, pm.environment.get('REGISTRATION_SECRET')); const b64 = CryptoJS.enc.Base64.stringify(CryptoJS.enc.Utf8.parse(hmac)); pm.environment.set("REGISTRATION_SIGNATURE", b64);
Code language: JavaScript (javascript)

This builds the string to sign from the request elements we need, calculates the HMAC of it using our secret, and then base64-encodes it before saving it in the Postman environment.

You can then add the signature into your request by adding the REGISTRATION_SIGNATURE variable to the body:

Hope that helps someone!

Minimal jQuery and extensions in Laravel

I recently needed to add a simple tag editor to a form input. I initially thought that Vue might help with this. That was a big mistake! Vue is seemingly pretty hopeless for this kind of thing – you can’t really use it for “sprinkling” JS elements, and progressive enhancement is a complete non-starter; that’s really more the domain of old-school jQuery, though I hear good things about alpine.js for this kind of enhancement. I learned a lot about Vue that I hadn’t planned on doing, but the overall impression was that it was simply the wrong tool for the job. I am not interested in building an SPA, and I’m certainly not out to rebuild my entire site just for sake of a single widget! My analogy for Laravel and Vue is like oil and vinegar in a salad dressing; they will happily coexist in the same bottle and taste great together, but they really like to be separate.

So, back to jQuery I go. jQuery was disabled by default in Laravel 6, but it’s just commented out in resources/js/bootstrap.js. It’s already included in the npm packages.json config file, so running npm install loads it into node_modules. I was really unclear about how additional JS modules should be added to Laravel using Mix. This was also a bit confusing because there isn’t really much you can point at and say “that’s mix”; it really comes down to what you put in webpack.mix.js in the project root and the npm run devscript that builds assets. However, the main thing that this does is load app.js, but then I found that things like this should be added in bootstrap.js (which is loaded by app.js) rather than adding them to the the mix config.

So the aim of the exercise was to add a tagging UI widget that takes a standard text input full of comma-delimited terms, and turns it into a pretty clickable tag element. Out of many worthy options, I settled on Tagify. After adding it with npm i @yaireo/tagify --save I had trouble figuring out where to actually load it from, but eventually I got it working by adding:

require('@yaireo/tagify/dist/jQuery.tagify.min.js');

to my bootstrap.js file, and evidently this looks in node_modules/to find the file without any additional help. After this I created a script in public/js/editthing.js (because inline scripts are worth avoiding if you’re serious about your CSP) that turned the standard input into a tag widget:

$('#tags').tagify();

and this script was loaded from blade using Laravel’s asset helper, which creates appropriate base URLs for public resources:

<script src="{{ asset('js/editthing.js') }}"></script>

I sometimes find Laravel docs and articles infuriating – there is often both too much and too little information at the same time, or they say things like “just add it to mix”. Many articles on simple subjects like this subvert Laravel’s features to shortcut to “working” (but ultimately counterproductive) solutions, and I wanted to approach this “the Laravel way”. For that reason I thought I’d make detailed notes for these very simple steps that I couldn’t find written down together elsewhere!

HTH